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‘Balls in Danger’: What are the balls?

Seth Kwame Boateng of Joy FM “Balls in Danger” has brought the men’s balls into the limelight, but what do you know about the balls? The Prostate.net has the answers to this question. Let’s look at what they have to say about the Balls:

“Testicles” and “balls” are not exactly the same thing. When men refer to their balls, they are actually talking about three things: the testicles, the scrotum (the skin sac that protects the testicles), and tiny tubes called epididymides that are attached to the testis and which store and transport sperm. Your testicles are your big T (testosterone) producers, so you want to make sure they are healthy and happy at all times!

Location, location, location

Real estate agents know the value of location, and your testicles aren’t much different. That is, your left ball and your right ball are not exactly next to each other; one hangs a little bit lower than the other (or one is higher than the other, your preference).

Each ball is approximately 2 inches by 1 inch, although typically the right testicle is slightly bigger than the left one. However, even though you might think the bigger testicle should hang lower, that’s not the way nature works. Go figure.

Bigger is not necessarily better

According to a study conducted at Emory University, men who have smaller testes are more likely to be nurturing dads than are their peers who have bigger balls. The authors evaluated 70 American men, including Caucasians, African-Americans, and Asians, who had a child aged one to two years old.

Analysis of brain function while the men looked at children and questionnaire responses resulted in the conclusion that “the biology of human males reflects a trade-off between mating effort and parenting effort, as indexed by testicular size and nurturing-related brain function, respectively.”

Two’s company, three’s a crowd

An extremely rare condition called polyorchidism is defined as the presence of three—or more—testicles. Only about 200 cases of polyorchidism, more or less, have been reported in the literature, so it’s not a condition that should keep you up at night with worry. However, if you have a unexplained mass in your scrotum, it’s something your doctor may want to rule out.

Pain in the balls.

If you experience painful, swollen, and/or inflamed testicles for no apparent reason (e.g., no one has kicked you down under), it may be time to see your doctor. Trauma to the testicles, such as from a sports injury, usually results in temporary pain.

In other cases, however, such as testicular torsion (twisted testicle, which is a medical emergency), epididymitis (inflammation of the epididymis, often caused by a sexually transmitted disease such as gonorrhea), inguinal hernia, testicular tumor, or orchitis (inflammation of the testicle from bacteria or viruses), a doctor should be consulted. Sometimes it’s more than just a pain in the balls!

Bumpy balls

One thing you can say about a man’s balls—they aren’t attractive. All those little bumps and lumps sure don’t make them pleasing to the eye, but are they dangerous as well? In most cases, no. However, an enlarged vein called a varicocele can have a negative impact on fertility and be painful. Tiny fluid-filled bumps called epididymal cysts are unsightly but harmless.

Only 4 percent of the unusual lumps on the balls end up being cancer. If you have a lump or bump that doesn’t seem quite right or that has appeared suddenly or changed in size or shape, be sure to have your doctor check it out.

Cool balls, man

Your body temperature may hover around 98.6 degrees, but your balls run about 1 to 3 degrees cooler. Why? It seems to be nature’s way to keep sperm “on ice” so to speak. A cooler temperature keeps sperm in a resting state until they are ready to move on and result in pregnancy or just a vacation away from home.

On the other side of the cooler, when men experience a fever or sit in a sauna for a length of time, their sperm counts are temporarily reduced. Cool is where it’s at.

Balls rise to the occasion

Just before a man ejaculates, his testicles rise up close to his body and make contact at the moment of truth. More specifically, in most men the right testicle begins the journey upwards before the left one. Since the right ball is usually already closer to the body (see “Location, location, location”), it has less of a journey to make.

Pampering balls?

If you want your balls to be all they can be, then pamper them. That means no smoking (lowers sperm count), limit alcohol use (lowers T and sperm count), dress them comfortably (no overly tight underwear, pants, or bathing suits—except on limited special occasions!), wash them daily and gently, and protect them from trauma, especially in sports.

On this latter point, wear a protective cup during contact sports and get the right saddle for your bicycle.

Balls have muscles

Well, not exactly, but there are several types of muscles in the area that are responsible for keeping your balls in motion. For example, the cremasteric muscle works like an elevator, causing your scrotum and testicles to rise and lower (see “Balls rise to the occasion”).

Another muscle called cartos causes the testicles to move within the scrotum. This muscle tissue is also the one that can be blamed for the wrinkly appearance of your balls. The good news: you don’t need to work these muscles in the gym!

Ball check

Once a month, all men should check their balls. Not just a perfunctory pat, but a thorough examination to be sure there are no hard lumps or any bumps that have changed in size or shape. Why?

Testicular cancer is not near the top of the disease list, but it does affect about 1 in every 270 men. When caught early, it usually can be cured. The best time to perform this ritual is when showering. If something doesn’t feel right, see your doctor.

Ball busting

During sexual arousal, a man’s balls can increase in size by 50 percent or more. Of course, most men are too busy thinking about something else while the blood is rushing to their testicles, but their partners may notice the change.

This ball busting event is temporary, and the testicles return to normal size once the excitement is over. However, if a man’s balls don’t return to normal size or become enlarged at other times, it’s time for a visit to your doctor.

 

 

 

 

Credit:

Raphael Nyarkotey Obu

Ejaculating 21 times a month can lower risk of prostate cancer

A new research has revealed that ejaculating at least 21 times a month significantly reduces a man’s risk of prostate cancer.

This is compared to those who release just four-to-seven times every four weeks, the Daily Mail reports.

The Harvard University study said that the findings are true, irrespective of whether men achieved orgasm through masturbation or sex.

The research did not speculate on why ejaculation protects against prostate cancer. But, previous studies showed that it helps to rid the gland of cancer-causing substances and infections.

How the study was carried out

The researchers analyzed 31,925 healthy men who completed a questionnaire about their ejaculation frequency back in 1992.

The researchers also assessed the monthly ejaculation frequency in men aged 20-to-29, 40-to-49 and the year before the questionnaire was completed.

The men were then followed until 2010.

Some 3,839 of the study’s participants were diagnosed with prostate cancer during the investigation.

Findings

The results showed that ejaculating at least 21 times a month significantly reduces the risk of prostate cancer in men aged 20-to-29 and 40-to-49.

This is compared to ejaculating just four-to-seven times a month.

“We found that men reporting higher compared to lower ejaculatory frequency in adulthood were less likely to be subsequently diagnosed with prostate cancer,” the researchers indicated.

The findings were published in the journal, European Urology.

Ejaculation was defined broadly and could be as a result of sex or masturbation.

Credit:

pulse.com.gh

Avoid these foods for a healthy heart

The worst offenders are probably not what you’d expect.

Heart disease is the number one killer of American adults; it takes the lives of 610,000 people each year, which is more than lung cancer, breast cancer, and skin cancer combined. Although heart disease and related complications can be genetic, your heart health is greatly impacted by lifestyle factors — especially by what you eat.

Most people assume dietary cholesterol is the number-one heart offender — after all, keeping your “bad” cholesterol (LDL) down and your “good” cholesterol (HDL) is essential for heart health — but recent research proves there’s no correlation between eating cholesterol and the levels of cholesterol in your blood. Instead, there are plenty of other foods that could be taking a heavy toll on your heart health without you realizing. Here are some of the biggest offenders, and be sure to avoid these 20 Worst Habits for Heart Health.

1. Added sugar

The sweet stuff that’s lurking in everything from candy to pasta sauce to ketchup is one of the worst offenders for your heart. “I am on a crusade against sugar,” says Adam Splaver, MD, clinical cardiologist and co-founder of NanoHealthAssociates. “Anything that has glucose, fructose or any sort of sugar is bad for your heart as it increases inflammation and inflammation begets cardiovascular disease.”

The FDA recommends people no more than consume 50 grams of added sugar a day, but the American Heart Association recommends no more than 36 grams of added sugar for men and 25 grams for women for optimal heart health.

2. High Fructose Corn Syrup

Sugar, in general, is bad for your heart, but high fructose corn syrup could be one of the worst offenders. Dr. Splaver warns that fructose can overload your liver and cause insulin resistance. This can lead to metabolic disorders such as type II diabetes. Check your labels, and be sure to avoid these 23 Shocking Foods with Hidden Corn Syrup.

3. Baked goods

“Baked goods have a double whammy of sugar and hidden saturated fat,” Dr. Splaver says. “[They] generally have no nutritional value and often contain hidden saturated fat and hydrogenated shortenings, which may raise your bad cholesterol (LDL).” Some hydrogenated shortenings contain trans fats, which have been shown to raise cholesterol levels.

4. Soda

It’s not just all the sugar that makes soda a problem, it’s the fact that it’s liquid sugar. “Drinking soda has serious consequences,” Dr. Splaver warns. “Regular soda promotes an insulin spike, which leads to weight gain and can cause a host of metabolic disorders. Beyond the sugars, soda has phosphoric acid which can promote osteoporosis and may be a cancer-causing agent. And the sugar can lead to inflammation which causes cardiovascular disease.”

5. Diet Soda

Think diet soda is a better alternative to the regular stuff? Think again. “Artificial sweeteners can lead to the same spike and risk of metabolic disease; a recent study indicated that excessive drinking can counterintuitively lead to weight gain,” Dr. Splaver says. “Consuming diet soda will tell your pancreas to make more insulin, which will increase your adiposity (fat deposits) and risk of cardiovascular disease.” Swap your soda (or diet soda) for sparkling water with a squeeze of fresh fruit.

6. Fruit Juice

Sure, even the purest fresh-squeezed fruit juice contains necessary vitamins and minerals, it’s also packed with heart-destroying sugar — one 8-ounce glass of orange juice has more than 20 grams of sugar. “Fruit juices are basically sugar and should be avoided,” Dr. Splaver says.

7. Vegetable Shortening

Although dietary cholesterol doesn’t impact blood cholesterol, saturated fat does. “Saturated fats like vegetable shortening increase inflammation and have a negative impact on your cholesterol parameters, which can cause cardiovascular disease,” Dr. Splaver says. Vegetable shortening is found in lots of packaged food, including wraps, tortillas, and baked goods. Be sure to read your labels for this dangerous saturated fat.

8. Margarine

Along the lines of vegetable oil, margarine is another common saturated fat that can increase inflammation, Dr. Splaver warns. Margarine and butter alternatives were traditionally made with partially hydrogenated oils, which are the most common sources of trans fats and have been linked to heart disease. However, the FDA have deemed trans fans no longer generally recognized as safe, and have ordered all companies to remove trans fats from their food by 2018. Still, margarine is still made mostly of vegetable oils, which could be worse than sugar.

9. Coffee creamer

Even if you’re trying to stay away from dairy, nondairy coffee creamers are not the way to go. They are a common source of hydrogenated oils, aka trans fats. Not only are trans fats inflammatory, but they’ve also been linked to heart disease. Even if all coffee creamers remove their trans fats by 2018, they’re still chock-full of chemicals and sometimes added sugars. Instead, we recommend Coffee Mate’s Natural Bliss creamers or Nutpods dairy-free creamers; they come in delicious flavors and no scary ingredients.

10. Full-fat cheese

Sure, cheese is delicious. But it should be enjoyed in moderation, especially when it comes to your heart health. “Dairy products should be limited because consumption increases inflammation,” Dr. Splaver warns. “In addition, many adults adults have lactose intolerance or sensitivity which can cause gastrointestinal issues.” Full-fat cheddar cheese on average contains about 113 calories and 9 grams of fat (6 grams saturated) per ounce (about a slice).

 

Source:eat this not that

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